Bristol Kick-Off Workshop: March 2017

The BRACE Project was officially launched in March with a series of seminars and a team workshop held at the University of Bristol. The event was attended by all UK members of the team plus Raju Sarkar from the Royal University of Bhutan, Aaron Velasco from the University of Texas at El Paso, and Mark Benthien from the Southern California Earthquake Center. The week proved to be a big hit and a great way to kick off the project with four seminars on everything from Himalayan tectonics to risk reduction strategies. You will find more information, including youtube videos of three of the talks below.

Raju Sarkar (Royal University of Bhutan)

Professor Raju Sarkar kicked off proceedings with a talk about the devastation caused by the 2015 Nepal earthquake and how Bhutan can better prepare itself for a future seismic event.

Unfortunately, due to a technical error with the video camera, we were only able to capture the first 17 minutes of Raju's presentation. However, you can view his talk slides here:

A few members of BRACE at the top of Cabot Tower overlooking the University of Bristol.

Left to right: Raju Sarkar, Aaron Velasco, Dan Haines, Frances Cooper, and Byron Adams.

Almost the entire BRACE team at the end of our first workshop (just missing Dowchu Drukpa, Kuenga Wangmo, and Karma Phuntsho!)

Left to right: Max Werner, Aaron Velasco, Dan Haines, Frances Harris, Byron Adams, Frances Cooper, Fergus Lyon, and Raju Sarkar.

BRACE KICK-OFF SEMINARS

Mark Benthien (Southern California Earthquake Center)

Mark talked about how we can best prepare for earthquakes and showed us just where the latest movie "San Francisco" went wrong!

Aaron Velasco (University of Texas at El Paso)

Professor Aaron Velasco introduced us to the incredible beauty but also the awesome destructive power of the Himalayan mountain chain, and the implications for vulnerable countries like Bhutan.

Byron Adams (University of Bristol)

Byron discussed the complex interplay between climate and tectonics and how they have both shaped the dramatic landscapes of the Himalaya we see today.